What Major Agreements Were Made At The Yalta Conference

Allied leaders came to Jaftal knowing that an Allied victory in Europe was virtually inevitable, but less convinced that the Pacific War was coming to an end. Recognizing that a victory over Japan might require a protracted struggle, the United States and Britain saw a great strategic advantage for Soviet involvement in the Pacific theater. In Kanta, Roosevelt and Churchill discussed with Stalin the conditions under which the Soviet Union would go to war with Japan, and all three agreed that the Soviets would be granted a sphere of influence in Manchuria in exchange for potentially decisive Soviet involvement in the Pacific theater after Japan`s surrender. These include the southern part of Sakhalin, a lease at Port Arthur (now L├╝shunkou), participation in the operation of the Manschur and Kuril Railways. This agreement was the most important concrete achievement of the Yalta Conference. By March 1945, it had become clear that Stalin had no intention of keeping his promises regarding political freedom in Poland. Instead, Soviet troops helped crush any opposition to the provisional government based in Lublin, Poland. When elections were finally held in 1947, they predictably consolidated Poland as one of the first Soviet satellite states in Eastern Europe. Kanta was the second of the three major war conferences among the three great ones. It was preceded by the Tehran Conference in November 1943, followed by the Potsdam Conference in July 1945, preceded by a conference in Moscow in October 1944, in which President Roosevelt did not participate, in which Churchill and Stalin had spoken of The European Western and Soviet spheres of influence.

[1] The first reaction to the Yalta agreements was solemn. Roosevelt and many other Americans saw this as proof that the spirit of U.S.-Soviet war cooperation would pass into the post-war period. At the time of the conference, Red Army Marshal Georgi Zhukov`s troops were 40 miles from Berlin. Stalin felt that his position at the conference was so strong that he could dictate the conditions. According to James F. Byrnes, a member of the U.S. delegation and future secretary of state, “it was not about what we would leave to the Russians, but about what we could get the Russians to do.” In addition, Roosevelt hoped for a commitment from Stalin to participate in the United Nations. The Kanta Conference was held from February 4 to 11, 1945 in a Russian resort in Crimea during World War II. In Kanta, U.S.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet Prime Minister Joseph Stalin made important decisions about the future course of the war and the post-war world. .