What Activity Is Regulated Under The Cites Agreement

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) was introduced to regulate international trade in endangered species. The aim is to ensure that international trade in wildlife specimens does not jeopardize their survival. Currently, the convention has more than 170 signatories. Dusky dolphins are listed in Schedule II, which means that they are considered a species that is not necessarily threatened with extinction, but trade with them must be controlled in order to avoid use incompatible with their survival. Therefore, all international trade must be regulated by the signatory countries through the CITES secretariat and the Conference of the Parties. At present, no international trade in obscure dolphins is known. CITES is an international agreement to which states and regional economic integration organizations voluntarily comply. States that have agreed to be bound by the Convention (CITES) are called contracting parties. Although CITES is legally binding on the contracting parties – that is, they must implement the convention – it is not a substitute for national laws. On the contrary, it provides a framework that must be respected by each contracting party that must adopt its own national legislation in order to ensure the implementation of CITES at the national level. CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) is an international agreement between governments.

The aim is to ensure that international trade in wildlife specimens does not jeopardize their survival. For this reason, there is an urgent need in Southeast Asian countries for practical guidelines and clear recommendations on how to effectively treat captive elephants so that health, reproduction and well-being are taken into account and guaranteed at all times. In 2011, Africam Safari Park and the Golden Triangle Asian Elephant Foundation (GTAEF) created the Target Training Project in the region. This project offers another non-traditional method to replace the traditional training method and raises awareness of these problems throughout the region. All of this involves local, national and international workshops where mahouts, veterinarians and camp leaders can learn and exercise the skills that international professional instructors have actually developed by working in zoos with high standards of elephant care and well-being, but with no intention of criticizing or underestimating their current management system or imposing another.